Chemistry in Progress

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Displaying theses 1-10 of 613 total
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J.F. van den Hoek
Master programme: Chemistry - Molecular design, synthesis and catalysis December 15th, 2017
Institute: Other Research group: DSM Coating Resins Graduation thesis Supervisor: Bas de Bruin
Alternating Ring-Opening Polymerization of Trimellitic Anhydride and Epoxides: Insight Into the Mechanism and Backbone Structure
The alternating copolymerization of anhydrides and epoxides is used as an alternative to the polycondensation of carboxylic acids and alcohols. Both reactions yield polyesters that can be used in developing (paint) coatings. In this thesis the efforts to better understand the mechanistic details of the synthesis of functionalized polyesters via the alternating copolymerization is described.
picture that illustrates the research done
Scientific abstract (pdf 1K)   For more info or full text, mail to: B.deBruin@uva.nl

L.L. Leenders
Master programme: Chemistry - Analytical Sciences November 3rd, 2017
Institute: Other Research group: RIKILT Institute of food safety Graduation thesis Supervisor: W. Th. Kok
Determination of ethanol metabolites in hair
Hair analysis is increasingly used over the past years in the detection of drugs in both forensic as clinical science. The detection window of hair is longer when compared to body fluids, and if a hair is analysed in a segmented way, it could give information about drug and alcohol abuse in a retrospective way. The problem in case of ethanol is the fact that ethanol itself cannot be detected in hair due to its high volatility, only its metabolites are incorporated into hair. In this project, a method is developed for the detection of two ethanol metabolites in hair with LC- and GC-MS(/MS). A method for the analysis of one of the metabolites, EtG, was developed, optimized and validated. Also, the initial method development for the analysis of both EtG as well as FAEEs with GC-MS(/MS) was executed. Analysis of both metabolites at the same time is not possible, since the clean-up is different for each of them. It was tried to combine some steps of the analysis, so that the method is more sufficient.
picture that illustrates the research done
Scientific abstract (pdf 2K)   Full text (pdf 2657K)

D.J. van der Burg
Master programme: Chemistry - Analytical Sciences October 17th, 2017
Institute: VU / Chem. & Pharm.Sc. Research group: VU Analytical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy Literature thesis Supervisor: Govert Somsen
Separation techniques for the quantification of protein aggregates
Biopharmaceuticals are pharmaceutical drug products consisting of proteins. These proteins tend to aggregate, causing adverse effects and patient safety issues. Therefore, detection of protein aggregates is crucial. Many analytical techniques could be used for the analysis of protein aggregates. In some cases, separation of the protein and protein aggregates is required for accurate quantification. Quantification of protein aggregates using separation techniques involves many challenges. The main challenge is that factors related to separation techniques could disrupt the aggregate distribution, resulting in unreliable results. These factors include dilution, shear stress, change of solvent conditions, adsorption to surfaces, and physical filtration. This literature thesis focusses on the possibilities of applying separation techniques for the quantification of protein aggregates. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC), asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4), analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC), disk centrifugation or differential centrifugal sedimentation (DCS), capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE), and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) will be discussed, together with their advantages, limitations, and applications.
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Scientific abstract (pdf 1K)   Full text (pdf 2499K)

E. Schuler
Master programme: Science for Energy and Sustainability - Physics / Chemistry September 20th, 2017
Institute: HIMS Research group: Synthetic Organic Chemistry Extra internship Supervisor: Chris Slootweg
photo of the author
From waste to feedstocks: Retrieval of nutrients from struvite with pyrolysis and CO2 acidification
Phosphorus and Nitrogen are recovered from struvite obtained from wastewater treatment plants. The recovery uses thermal treatment and acidification with CO2 infusion.
picture that illustrates the research done
Scientific abstract (pdf 2K)   For more info or full text, mail to: j.c.slootweg@uva.nl

E. Schuler
Master programme: Science for Energy and Sustainability - Physics / Chemistry September 20th, 2017
Institute: HIMS Research group: Faculteit der Natuurwetenschappen, Wiskunde en Inf Literature thesis Supervisor: Bob van der Zwaan
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Low-carbon energy development scenarios for Africa: Trade of fossil energy carriers
Trade capacities for fossile energy carriers in Africa for scenario modelling.
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Scientific abstract (pdf 3K)   Full text (pdf 3040K)

A.A. Urech
Master programme: Chemistry - Molecular Simulation and Photonics September 20th, 2017
Institute: WZI Research group: Quantum Gases & Quantum Information Literature thesis Supervisor: Florian Schreck
Artificial gauge fields and optical flux lattices
This thesis gives a brief introduction into the simulation of artificial gauge fields in ultracold atoms. It provides an introduction into the behavior of charged particles in the presence of a magnetic field, and the types of phenomena that result from this behavior. It goes on to discuss the possibilities of creating similar effects in ultracold neutral atoms through the accumulation of a geometrical phase using optically dressed states. Finally, this thesis ends with an overview of a recent proposal for simulating a synthetic magnetic flux in neutral atoms known as an optical flux lattice.
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Scientific abstract (pdf 1K)   Full text (pdf 812K)

A.A. Urech
Master programme: Chemistry - Molecular Simulation and Photonics September 20th, 2017
Institute: WZI Research group: Quantum Gases & Quantum Information Graduation thesis Supervisor: Florian Schreck
Work towards Creating a Quantum Gas of Strontium and Construction of 3P0 & 3P2 Clock lasers
In this thesis the process of cooling a gas of strontium atoms with a Magneto optical trap is described. The atoms are cooled down to micro-kelvin temperatures with the processes outlined. Laser cooling methods are used to accomplish this. The thesis also descirbes the work that has been completed on the construction of ultranarrow linewidth lasers that will be used in future experiments. These lasers will be able to address transitions from the 1S0 groundstate to the metastable 3P0 and 3P2 states.
picture that illustrates the research done
Scientific abstract (pdf 1K)   Full text (pdf 18469K)

M.H. Rijnveld
Master programme: Chemistry - Molecular design, synthesis and catalysis August 31st, 2017
Institute: HIMS Research group: Homegeneous and Supramolecular Catalysis Literature thesis Supervisor: Jarl van der Vlught
Thermodynamics of Transition Metal Hydrides
Electrocatalysts, such as Pt, provide suitable properties for hydrogen production as an energy source, but their high costs and low abundance limit their general use. Many catalysts have been discovered by mimicking nature and using inexpensive and abundant first row transition metals such as Ni, Co, Fe and Mo. All these catalysts proceed via metal hydride intermediates in order to be able to release a hydride, proton or hydrogen atom. The thermodynamic properties of metal hydride intermediates can provide useful guidance for the production of H2 by heterocoupling of a hydride and a proton from the same metal complex. The knowledge obtained about the factors affecting the metal hydride interaction is used to understand the thermodynamics of nickel and cobalt hydrogenase complexes; [HNi(PR2NR’2)2]2+ and [HCo(PR2NR’2)2]+.
picture that illustrates the research done
Scientific abstract (pdf 2K)   For more info or full text, mail to: j.I.vanderVlugt@uva.nl

M.H. Rijnveld
Master programme: Chemistry - Molecular design, synthesis and catalysis August 30th, 2017
Institute: HIMS Research group: Sustainable Materials Characterisation Graduation thesis Supervisor: Moniek Tromp
A comprehensive study of Pt/CeO2 catalysts for the water gas shift reaction
The stronger dependency on fossil fuels will accelerate the depletion of fossil fuel reserves, increase its costs due to scarcity and destabilise the global economy. A powerful alternative for fossil fuels that can be used in the automotive industry is the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) that uses hydrogen as the fuel and air as the oxidant. However, the effect of CO contaminants on fuel cells, is one of the most important issues in fuel cell operation and therefore a high purity hydrogen stream is required. An important component of the fuel processors for purification is the Water Gas Shift reaction. A promising catalyst for the conversion of CO in CO2 is platinum supported by cerium oxide due to its high Oxygen Storage Capacity and redox activity. This thesis offers a comprehensive study of the inner workings of Pt/CeO2 with various platinum loadings (0.4-5wt% Pt) and two different morphologies of ceria (cubes and rods) that affect the activity. In order to answer the research question, catalytic tests at realistic industrial conditions are performed and the catalyst and support are characterised using state-of-the-art techniques.
picture that illustrates the research done
Scientific abstract (pdf 2K)   For more info or full text, mail to: m.tromp@uva.nl

E.L. Robbins
Master programme: Chemistry - Molecular design, synthesis and catalysis August 30th, 2017
Institute: HIMS Research group: Molecular Photonics Group Graduation thesis Supervisor: Dr. Rene M. Williams
Fullerenes, Perylene-bisimides and Porphyrins as Photosensitizers
To develop new molecules and materials that can be made suitable for PDT/PACT. The main focus is particularly on the making of thin film materials, containing organic molecules, for antibacterial purposes. With this in mind, the photophysical properties of fullerenes, perylene-bisimides and porphyrins (as molecules and/or molecular dyads in solution, in both thin film blends as well as composite blends) have been studied regarding their triplet excited states, singlet oxygen generation and reactivity.
picture that illustrates the research done
Scientific abstract (pdf 1K)   For more info or full text, mail to: r.m.williams@uva.nl

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